April 22, 2017

Workshops

The ACC will offer workshops addressing current and future topics in automatic control from experts in academia, national laboratories, and industry. The workshops at ACC 2018 will take place prior to the conference on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at the conference venue (the Hilton Milwaukee Hotel).

Workshops:

W1: Nonlinear Regression Modeling for Control Applications
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Founder’s
Organizer(s): R. Russell Rhinehart
Abstract: See below.

W2: Practical Methods for Real World Control Systems
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Wright A
Organizer(s): Daniel Y. Abramovitch, Michael A. Borrello, Sean B. Andersson, Craig Buhr
Abstract: See below.

W3: New Problems on Learning and Data Science in Control Theory
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Wright B
Organizer(s): Aranya Chakrabortty, Anthony Kuh
Abstract: See below.

W4: Nonlinear and Computational Control: A Workshop to Honor Prof. John Hauser on his 60th Birthday
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Oak
Organizer(s): Eric Feron
Abstract: See below.

W5: Modeling, Prediction, and Design for Complex Networks: A Multi-Disciplinary Perspective
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Walker
Organizer(s): Stacy Patterson, Jianxi Gao, Sergio Pequito
Abstract: See below.

W6: Interdisciplinary Approaches for Control of Large-scale Complex Systems: Latest Developments and Future Trends
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Golda Meir
Organizer(s): Jianming Lian, Tao Yang
Abstract: See below

W7: From Theory to Practice in Control: Enhancing Innovation and Impact
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: MacArthur
Organizer(s): Tariq Samad, O. Lucia Quintero
Abstract: See below.

W8: Interdisciplinary Research to Advance the State-of-the-Art in Human Machine Interaction and Human Robot Interaction
Full-Day Workshop
CANCELLED

W9: Autonomous Vehicles: An Open Platform for Learning and Teaching
Full-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Location: Wright C
Organizer(s): Jon Gonzales, Charlott Vallon, Francesco Borelli
Abstract: See below.

W10: Fast Extremum Seeking Control: Theory, Methods and Applications
Half-Day Workshop
June 26th
8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Location: Miller
Organizer(s): Martin Guay, Denis Dochain
Abstract: See below.

W11: COAChing Strong Academics in the Art of Strategic Persuasion
Half-Day Workshop
CANCELLED

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ABSTRACTS

W1: Nonlinear Regression Modeling for Control Applications 

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizer:       R. Russell Rhinehart (Oklahoma State University)
Location:         MacArthur

This full-day workshop provides a practical guide for nonlinear regression modeling, with a focus on developing both static and dynamic models for control applications.  Although theoretical analysis behind techniques will be revealed, the takeaway will be the participant’s ability to:

  • Choose appropriate concepts for defining the regression objective,
  • Choose an optimization approach and criteria for convergence,
  • Apply both data-based and logical criteria for model validation and model discrimination,
  • Design experiments for data generation that support model validation,
  • Select an appropriate model design considering both order/complexity and in-use utility, and
  • Estimate model uncertainty based on data variability.

Participants will receive software for solutions to in-class exercises and implementation techniques in Excel/VBA, a commonly available environment (the techniques could be programmed in any environment).  Techniques include the development of FOPDT, SOPDT, ARMA, neural network, fuzzy-logic and phenomenological models.  The course will provide files to implement Leapfrogging as an optimizer, statistical improvement as stopping criteria, bootstrapping for estimating model uncertainty, along with several case-study data sets for revealing course concepts.  Participants are invited to bring a laptop with Excel version 2010 or higher to participate in applications.  Participants will also receive the workshop presentation material.  Participants may want to independently acquire the book, Nonlinear Regression Modeling for Engineering Applications: Modeling, Model Validation, and Enabling Design of Experiments, by Rhinehart (Wiley, 2016, ISBN 9781118597965).

W2: Practical Methods for Real World Control Systems

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizers:
Daniel Y. Abramovitch (Agilent Technologies)
Michael A. Borrello (Philips Healthcare)
Sean B. Andersson (Boston University)
Craig Buhr (Mathworks)
Location:         Wright A

A question one should ask of any advanced algorithm is, “How do we make that work in a real system?” A question one should ask of any industrial control system is, “How do we apply better algorithms to this problem?”  The two questions are dual sides of the same “bridging the gap” problem that has hounded control for decades.  This workshop will examine practical methods that address this problem from both sides: ways to implement advanced algorithms on real systems and ways to improve industrial control using advanced methods.   We will examine which system identification methods work on which physical systems, as model-based control requires a model.  We will discuss why so many industrial controllers are PIDs, present a universal framework for different PID implementations, describe how to tune the PID to the identified system model, and show how to augment these with higher order controller dynamics (a.k.a. filters).  We will discuss how to make state-space models more useable in real-time systems. Speaking of which, we will explain how to program filters and PIDs in real-time control systems.   We will discuss things to know about hardware implementation and tradeoffs with ADCs, DACs, and analog filters.  We will talk about the current set of real-time processing chips and the programming models that go along with them. Throughout we will offer hardware/software demonstrations of how tools like Matlab and Simulink can be used in these contexts. We won’t bridge the gap in a day, but we can move the needle.

A web page that holds the information from the brochure can be found at:
dabramovitch.com/practical_methods/

A PDF version of the workshop flyer can be found here:
dabramovitch.com/practical_methods/practical_methods_workshop_overview_2.pdf

W3: New Problems on Learning and Data Science in Control Theory

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizers:
Aranya Chakrabortty (North Carolina State University)
Anthony Kuh (National Science Foundation)
Location:         Wright B

Big data is a term we hear being bandied about more and more. Indeed, data is growing exponentially. These data may originate from many disparate sources, ranging from scientific instruments to social media, from transactional data to machine-generated data from the Internet of Things (IoT), and from administrative data to large-scale simulation data. The objective of this workshop is to start a dialogue on how data science and control theory can benefit from each other. We intend to have a clear understanding of why the value of data has traditionally been under-utilized and under-emphasized in the controls community, what new dimensions can control theory gain from data science and machine learning, and what primary analytical and experimental tools are needed to make this marriage more successful. We will invite twelve distinguished control theorists working in various aspects and applications of data-driven algorithms to give talks on their recent research findings on this subject. The discussions will span the underlying fundamentals in control, optimization, state estimation, system identification, inferencing, and learning with applications ranging from power grids, transportation, urban mobility, smart cities, and general cyber-physical systems. The importance of security and privacy of data in each of these domains, and their impact on public benefit will be emphasized. Special attention will be paid to the scalability properties of learning algorithms as well as to their sensitivity to various forms of uncertainties in the model and imperfections in the data.

The agenda and details for our ACC workshop (Data science and control theory) can be found at the following weblink:

https://people.engr.ncsu.edu/achakra2/acc-workshop.pdf

 

W4: A Workshop to Honor Prof. John Hauser on his 60th Birthday

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizers:      Eric Feron (Georgia Institute of Technology)
Location:         Oak

John Hauser has been an extraordinary contributor to several areas in dynamics and control systems, with a predilection for nonlinear and computationally demanding systems. His intellectual contributions are motivated by his numerous passions including, but not limited to, riding fighter jets and high performance motorcycles.  ACC 2018 takes place in Wisconsin, where John grew up as a child. This workshop brings together several friends of John’s to discuss various aspects of the foregoing disciplines. Specific topics to be discussed include periodic orbits, Lyapunov functions and their role in computer science, real time control via convex optimization, control with oscillating inputs, hybrid systems, trajectory planning and execution. Applications include motorcycles, cars, air vehicles, and robotic grasping. Confirmed speakers include: Behcet Acikmese (U. Washington, Seattle), P. Afman (Georgia Tech), Aaron Ames (Caltech), Andrzej Banaszuk (UTRC), Alessandro Beghi (U. Padova), Francesco Bullo (UCSB), Eric Feron (Georgia Tech), Pierre-Loic Garoche (ONERA – NASA), Richard Murray (Caltech), Giuseppe Notarstefano (U. Salento), Alessandro Saccon (T.U. Eindhoven), Panagiotis Tsiotras (Georgia Tech), Tim Wang (UTRC), Claire Walton (Naval Postgraduate School), Yorai Wardi (Georgia Tech). Owing to John’s great contributions to the culinary experience of his friends, a comprehensive wine and protein-rich food buffet will be set up. Alternative food and drinks will also be available.

For more information about the workshop, including its agenda, abstracts of presentations, and biosketches of presenters, please visit http://www.feron.org/Eric/hauser60

W5: Modeling, Prediction, and Design for Complex Networks: A Multi-Disciplinary Perspective

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizers:
Stacy Patterson
Jianxi Gao
Sergio Pequito
Location:         Wright C

Networks are pervasive in today’s world. These include both physical networks, such as the power grid and the internet, and abstractions for systems, such as supply chains and even the human brain.  The robustness and adaptivity of these networks are fundamental to sustaining vital processes and infrastructures in both normal and emergency situations. The prevalent role of such complex networks, as well as the emerging importance of networked systems like Cyber-Physical Systems and the Internet-of-Things have motivated significant research efforts in the past few decades. Although there have been the many notable research achievements in the study of complex networks, there are still interesting and impactful open questions on how best to model these systems, how to predict and analyze processes and dynamics within these systems, how to analyze network robustness and resilience, and how optimize for various performance measures through network design and control. This workshop will survey analytical tools, state-of-art research, and open problems in real and artificial networks. The presentations draw from a variety of disciplines, including biology, physics, engineering, and computer science, emphasizing the multi-disciplinary aspects of both the problems and solutions. The goal is to equip attendees with a set of unified analytical tools and methodologies for modeling, analysis, prediction, and design of complex networks. This workshop will also serve as arena where researchers can identify grand challenges and spark inter-disciplinary collaborations in complex networks and their applications.
The webpage of the workshop will be as follows: https://sites.google.com/site/workshopacc18/

W6: Interdisciplinary Approaches for Control of Large-scale Complex Systems: Latest Developments and Future Trends

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)

Organizers:

Jianming Lian (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

Tao Yang (University of North Texas)

Location:  Golda Meir

Efficient operation and effective protection of critical infrastructures such as electric power grid, water/gas supply network, transportation system and etc. are essential to ensure America’s security and prosperity, and thus have the top priority in national research agenda. These infrastructure systems are becoming increasingly large, complex, dynamic, heterogeneous, dispersed and behavioral. Moreover, different infrastructure systems are becoming more and more interconnected and interdependent. This trend has imposed very significant challenges on the corresponding control design to achieve efficient operation and effective protection of these critical infrastructures. On the one hand, these systems have been growing to be so complex for conventional control approaches to achieve efficient system operation. On the other hand, the extensive deployment of advanced information and communications technologies (ICT) for control support in these systems has introduced various new issues. Although they are serious, these challenges also present opportunities for us to rethink the control design for efficient operation and effective protection of critical infrastructure. Various interdisciplinary approaches such as distributed optimization, data science, microeconomics, and encryption have been recently proposed to address these challenges. This workshop intends to bring together leading researchers from both universities and national laboratories to discuss the technical obstacles, present their latest solutions and share their views of the future trends regarding interdisciplinary control for critical infrastructures. It is designed to be accessible to a broad controls audience, and will be particularly useful for beginning graduate students interested in working in the area of control.

The webpage of the workshop will be as follows:

https://cpes.engineering.unt.edu/acc-2018-workshop

W7: From Theory to Practice in Control Enhancing Innovation and Impact

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizers:
Tariq Samad (University of Minnesota – Twin Cities)
Lucia Quintero (Universidad EAFIT in Medellin, Colombia)
Location:         Kilburn

How can the control community—including students, researchers, practitioners, and technology managers—excel at innovation? This workshop will present insights and recommendations for advancing the societal and industry impact of advanced control. Presenters include senior representatives of a diverse set of major corporations (Amazon, General Motors, Honeywell, and Medtronic) who will present key areas for innovation in their companies and offer guidance on how to achieve successful careers in industry. In addition, entrepreneurial academics who have taken research to commercial offerings will discuss their experiences in bridging the theory-practice gap, and thought leaders on technology management will review societal trends and provide their perspectives on innovation practices. The presenters also include current and former leaders at NSF and professional organizations. In addition to formal presentations, the agenda will include two discussion sessions with the audience. The first discussion will be held in the morning and will identify key issues and challenges. The second will conclude the workshop and will focus on articulating recommendations for students, faculty, and the community. The target audience for the workshop includes graduate students interested in corporate careers; faculty, students, and other innovators with research developments that could be candidates for new ventures; junior R&D staff in industry who aspire to be future leaders, entrepreneurs, and intrapreneurs; and graduate students and faculty seeking to identify industry-relevant research topics. This workshop is an activity of the IFAC Industry Committee, of which the lead organizer is the founding chair; workshop participants will have the opportunity to continue the discussion through Industry Committee channels that are being established.

For more information about the workshop, including its agenda, abstracts of presentations, and biosketches of presenters, please visit https://tli.umn.edu/2018-American-Control-Conference.

W8: The State-of-the-Art in Human-Machine and Human-Robot Interactions

CANCELLED

W9: Autonomous Vehicles: An Open Platform for Learning and Teaching

Full day (8:30am – 5:30pm)
Organizers:
Jon Gonzales (University of California, Berkeley)
Charlott Vallon (University of California, Berkeley)
Francesco Borelli (University of California, Berkeley)
Location:         Walker

Autonomous cars hold tremendous promise for making transportation safer, faster and cleaner than the manually driven vehicles we use today. At UC Berkeley we have developed an open source platform called the Berkeley Autonomous Race Car (BARC) to teach students how to program autonomous vehicles. The platform consists of a 1/10 scale RC car, an embedded Linux micro-controller, and a suite of sensors. Our software stack also integrates features from ROS (Robotic Operating Systems) with cloud functionality through Amazon Web Services, so that cloud-based telemetry and simulations can be used to speed up estimation and control design. The BARC project is fully open-source and welcomes other research intuitions to use the platform. More information is available at barc-project.com.

This one-day workshop aims to introduce students, practitioners and teachers to designing model-based vehicle dynamics controllers through hands-on experience with the BARC platform. The participants will design a wide range of vehicle dynamics and Advanced Driver Assistance controllers, from simple lane changes with obstacle avoidance to autonomous drifting. The participants will be provided with a set of structured labs which can be used to learn and teach the topics discussed.

We will first present the basic control architecture and vehicle dynamics models used throughout the workshop. Then, the instruction will focus heavily on how to program algorithms in Python and Julia within the ROS framework. Participants are expected to bring their own laptops and download the workshop material before attending the class. The material will prepare the participants for in-class instruction and demonstration of the exercises. Participants will form small groups and program their algorithms on our robotic platform.

W10: Fast Extremum Seeking Control: Theory, Methods and Applications

Half day (8:30am – 12:30pm)
Organizers:
Martin Guay (Queen’s University in Kingston, ON)
Denis Dochain (Universite ́ Catholique de Louvain in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Location:         Mitchell

Extremum-seeking control (ESC) has been the subject of considerable research effort over the last decade. The revived interest in the field was primarily sparked by Krstic and co-workers who provided an elegant proof of the convergence of a standard perturbation based extremum seeking scheme for a general class of nonlinear systems. The main drawback of ESC is the lack of transient performance guarantees. As highlighted in the proof of Krstic and Wang, the stability analysis relies on two components: 1) an averaging analysis of the persistently perturbed ESC loop and 2) a time-scale separation of ESC closed-loop dynamics between the fast transients of the system dynamics and the slow quasi steady-state extremum-seeking task. Over the last few years, many researchers have considered various approaches to overcome the limitations of ESC. The main limitation of ESC is the need for a time-scale separation. Under the two time-scale assumption, the optimization operates at a quasi steady-state, or slow, time-scale such that the search for optimal operating conditions does not affect the process dynamics. Following twenty years of research developments, this strikingly general and practically relevant control approach is now equipped with an established and well understood control theoretical framework. The objective of this course is to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental developments in this field for researchers, graduate students and practitioners. The focus of the course is on the design of ESC systems using various leading methodologies which include classical perturbation based methods, estimation based methods and Lie-bracket averaging techniques. Several emerging applications of ESC will be presented including: distributed optimization, model-free control and observer design. The workshop targets practicing control engineers, graduate students and researchers interested in extremum-seeking control and real-time optimization of dynamical systems.

W11: COAChing Strong Academics in the Art of Strategic Persuasion

CANCELLED

________________________________________

For more information about workshops please contact:

Workshops Chair
Sahika Genc
Amazon
sahika@amazon.com